PROMETHAZINE HYDROCHLORIDE, AND CODEINE PHOSPHATE SYRUP   CV, FORM NO. 1627, Rev. 1/09, VC3276, Rx Only

/PROMETHAZINE HYDROCHLORIDE, AND CODEINE PHOSPHATE SYRUP   CV, FORM NO. 1627, Rev. 1/09, VC3276, Rx Only
PROMETHAZINE HYDROCHLORIDE, AND CODEINE PHOSPHATE SYRUP   CV, FORM NO. 1627, Rev. 1/09, VC3276, Rx Only2018-09-06T09:12:40+00:00

Prescription Drug Name:

PROMETHAZINE HYDROCHLORIDE, AND CODEINE PHOSPHATE SYRUP   CV, FORM NO. 1627, Rev. 1/09, VC3276, Rx Only

ID:

a4fd8978-2036-43cb-ab16-b0dd98d6cd5b

Code:

34391-3

DESCRIPTION


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displayName: DESCRIPTION SECTION
FDA Article Code: 34089-3

Each 5 mL (one teaspoonful), for oral administration contains: Promethazine hydrochloride 6.25 mg; codeine phosphate 10 mg. Alcohol 7%. Inactive Ingredients: Citric acid, corn syrup, D&C Red #33, FD&C Blue #1, flavor, methylparaben, propylene glycol, propylparaben, purified water, saccharin sodium, sodium benzoate, sodium citrate. Codeine is one of the naturally occurring phenanthrene alkaloids of opium derived from the opium poppy; it is classified pharmacologically as a narcotic analgesic. Codeine phosphate may be chemically designated as 7,8-Didehydro-4,5α-epoxy-3-methoxy-17-methylmorphinan-6α -ol phosphate (1:1)(salt) hemihydrate. The phosphate salt of codeine occurs as white, needle-shaped crystals or white crystalline powder. Codeine phosphate is freely soluble in water and slightly soluble in alcohol. It has a molecular weight of 406.37, a molecular formula of C18H21NO3•H3PO4•½H2O, and the following structural formula: Promethazine hydrochloride, a phenothiazine derivative, is chemically designated as (±)-10-[2-(Dimethylamino)propyl] phenothiazine monohydrochloride. Promethazine hydrochloride occurs as a white to faint yellow, practically odorless, crystalline powder which slowly oxidizes and turns blue on prolonged exposure to air. It is soluble in water and freely soluble in alcohol. It has a molecular weight of 320.88, a molecular formula of C17H20N2S•HCl, and the following structural formula:

CLINICAL PHARMACOLOGY


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displayName: CLINICAL PHARMACOLOGY SECTION
FDA Article Code: 34090-1

Codeine: Narcotic analgesics, including codeine, exert their primary effects on the central nervous system and gastrointestinal tract. The analgesic effects of codeine are due to its central action; however, the precise sites of action have not been determined, and the mechanisms involved appear to be quite complex. Codeine resembles morphine both structurally and pharmacologically, but its actions at the doses of codeine used therapeutically are milder, with less sedation, respiratory depression and gastrointestinal, urinary, and pupillary effects. Codeine produces an increase in biliary tract pressure, but less than morphine or meperidine. Codeine is less constipating than morphine. Codeine has good antitussive activity, although less than that of morphine at equal doses. It is used in preference to morphine, because side effects are infrequent at the usual antitussive dose of codeine. Codeine in oral therapeutic dosage does not usually exert major effects on the cardiovascular system. Narcotic analgesics may cause nausea and vomiting by stimulating the chemoreceptor trigger zone (CTZ); however, they also depress the vomiting center, so that subsequent doses are unlikely to produce vomiting. Nausea is minimal after usual oral doses of codeine. Narcotic analgesics cause histamine release, which appears to be responsible for wheals or urticaria sometimes seen at the site of injection on parenteral administration. Histamine release may also produce dilation of cutaneous blood vessels, with resultant flushing of the face and neck, pruritus, and sweating. Codeine and its salts are well absorbed following both oral and parenteral administration. Codeine is about 2/3 as effective orally as parenterally. Codeine is metabolized primarily in the liver by enzymes of the endoplasmic reticulum, where it undergoes O-demethylation, N-demethylation, and partial conjugation with glucuronic acid. The drug is excreted primarily in the urine, largely as inactive metabolites and small amounts of free and conjugated morphine. Negligible amounts of codeine and its metabolites are found in the feces. Following oral or subcutaneous administration of codeine, the onset of analgesia occurs within 15 to 30 minutes and lasts for four to six hours. The cough-depressing action, in animal studies, was observed to occur 15 minutes after oral administration of codeine, peak action at 45 to 60 minutes after ingestion. The duration of action, which is dose-dependent, usually did not exceed 3 hours. Promethazine: Promethazine is a phenothiazine derivative which differs structurally from the antipsychotic phenothiazines by the presence of a branched side chain and no ring substitution. It is thought that this configuration is responsible for its relative lack (1/10 that of chlorpromazine) of dopamine antagonist properties. Promethazine is an H1 receptor blocking agent. In addition to its antihistaminic action, it provides clinically useful sedative and antiemetic effects. Promethazine is well absorbed from the gastrointestinal tract. Clinical effects are apparent within 20 minutes after oral administration and generally last four to six hours, although they may persist as long as 12 hours. Promethazine is metabolized by the liver to a variety of compounds; the sulfoxides of promethazine and N-demethylpromethazine are the predominant metabolites appearing in the urine.

INDICATIONS AND USAGE


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displayName: INDICATIONS & USAGE SECTION
FDA Article Code: 34067-9

Promethazine hydrochloride and codeine phosphate syrup is indicated for the temporary relief of coughs and upper respiratory symptoms associated with allergy or the common cold.

CONTRAINDICATIONS


id: e170ad15-c46f-4087-95c2-576880c11c5f
displayName: CONTRAINDICATIONS SECTION
FDA Article Code: 34070-3

The combination of promethazine hydrochloride and codeine phosphate is contraindicated in pediatric patients less than 6 years of age, because the combination may cause fatal respiratory depression in this age population. Codeine is contraindicated in patients with a known hypersensitivity to the drug. Promethazine is contraindicated in comatose states, and in individuals known to be hypersensitive or to have had an idiosyncratic reaction to promethazine or to other phenothiazines. Antihistamines and codeine are both contraindicated for use in the treatment of lower respiratory tract symptoms, including asthma.

PRECAUTIONS


id: 80a025ab-bff4-4f44-8c93-8a39be8aa1fb
displayName: PRECAUTIONS SECTION
FDA Article Code: 42232-9

Animal reproduction studies have not been conducted with the drug combination-promethazine and codeine. It is not known whether this drug combination can cause fetal harm when administered to a pregnant woman or can affect reproduction capacity. Promethazine hydrochloride and codeine phosphate should be given to a pregnant woman only if clearly needed.

OVERDOSAGE


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displayName: OVERDOSAGE SECTION
FDA Article Code: 34088-5

Codeine: Serious overdose with codeine is characterized by respiratory depression (a decrease in respiratory rate and/or tidal volume, Cheyne-Stokes respiration, cyanosis), extreme somnolence progressing to stupor or coma, skeletal muscle flaccidity, cold and clammy skin, and sometimes bradycardia and hypotension. The triad of coma, pinpoint pupils, and respiratory depression is strongly suggestive of opiate poisoning. In severe overdosage, particularly by the intravenous route, apnea, circulatory collapse, cardiac arrest, and death may occur. Promethazine is additive to the depressant effects of codeine. It is difficult to determine what constitutes a standard toxic or lethal dose. However, the lethal oral dose of codeine in an adult is reported to be in the range of 0.5 to 1.0 gram. Infants and children are believed to be relatively more sensitive to opiates on a body-weight basis. Elderly patients are also comparatively intolerant to opiates. Promethazine: Signs and symptoms of overdosage with promethazine HCl range from mild depression of the central nervous system and cardiovascular system to profound hypotension, respiratory depression, unconsciousness, and sudden death. Other reported reactions include hyperreflexia, hypertonia, ataxia, athetosis, and extensor-plantar reflexes (Babinski reflex). Stimulation may be evident, especially in children and geriatric patients. Convulsions may rarely occur. A paradoxical-type reaction has been reported in children receiving single doses of 75 mg to 125 mg orally, characterized by hyperexcitability and nightmares. Atropine-like signs and symptoms – dry mouth, fixed dilated pupils, flushing, as well as gastrointestinal symptoms may occur. Treatment: The treatment of overdosage with promethazine and codeine is essentially symptomatic and supportive. Only in cases of extreme overdosage or individual sensitivity do vital signs including respiration, pulse, blood pressure, temperature, and EKG need to be monitored. Activated charcoal orally or by lavage may be given, or sodium or magnesium sulfate orally as a cathartic. Attention should be given to the reestablishment of adequate respiratory exchange through provision of a patent airway and institution of assisted or controlled ventilation. The narcotic antagonist, naloxone hydrochloride, may be administered when significant respiratory depression occurs with promethazine and codeine; any depressant effects of promethazine are not reversed with naloxone. Diazepam may be used to control convulsions. Avoid analeptics, which may cause convulsions. Acidosis and electrolyte losses should be corrected. A rise in temperature or pulmonary complications may signal the need for institution of antibiotic therapy. Severe hypotension usually responds to the administration of norepinephrine or phenylephrine. EPINEPHRINE SHOULD NOT BE USED, since its use in a patient with partial adrenergic blockade may further lower the blood pressure. Limited experience with dialysis indicates that it is not helpful.

DOSAGE AND ADMINISTRATION


id: 3b22942d-1a46-4031-9cd1-9e6a179b24ce
displayName: DOSAGE & ADMINISTRATION SECTION
FDA Article Code: 34068-7

The combination of promethazine hydrochloride and codeine phosphate is contraindicated in pediatric patients less than 6 years of age, because the combination may cause fatal respiratory depression in this age population. It is important that promethazine hydrochloride and codeine phosphate syrup is measured with an accurate measuring device (see PRECAUTIONS-Information for Patients). A household teaspoon is not an accurate measuring device and could lead to overdosage, especially when half a teaspoon is to be measured. It is strongly recommended that an accurate measuring device be used. A pharmacist can provide an appropriate device and can provide instructions for measuring the correct dose. The average effective dose for adults and children (12 years and over) is: 1 teaspoonful (5mL) every 4 to 6 hours, not to exceed 30 mL in 24 hours. The average effective dose for children 6 years to under 12 years of age is ½ to 1 teaspoonful (2.5 mL to 5 mL) every 4 to 6 hours, not to exceed 30 mL in 24 hours.

HOW SUPPLIED


id: 0e023a8e-4f82-465c-9e18-633d70b6b299
displayName: HOW SUPPLIED SECTION
FDA Article Code: 34069-5

Promethazine Hydrochloride and Codeine Phosphate Syrup contains promethazine hydrochloride 6.25 mg/5 mL, codeine phosphate 10 mg/5 mL and alcohol 7 percent, and is available in 4 fluid ounce (118 mL), 8 fluid ounce (237 mL), and pint (473 mL) bottles. Store at 20 – 25°C (68 – 77°F) [see USP Controlled Room Temperature]. Dispense in a tight, light-resistant container as defined in the USP. Manufactured by
Actavis Mid Atlantic LLC
7205 Windsor Blvd.
Baltimore, MD 21244 USA

Repackaged by
Rebel Distributors Corp
Thousand Oaks, CA 91320

Principal Display Panel


id: e2cbf014-adfe-4e3d-90dc-dc6f91392834
displayName: PACKAGE LABEL.PRINCIPAL DISPLAY PANEL
FDA Article Code: 51945-4