METOPROLOL TARTRATE – metoprolol tartrate tablet, film coated, R x only

/METOPROLOL TARTRATE – metoprolol tartrate tablet, film coated, R x only
METOPROLOL TARTRATE – metoprolol tartrate tablet, film coated, R x only2018-09-06T09:12:40+00:00

Prescription Drug Name:

METOPROLOL TARTRATE – metoprolol tartrate tablet, film coated, R x only

ID:

6f3d9b87-3f98-084d-e053-2991aa0a8f62

Code:

34391-3

DESCRIPTION


id: 6f3d9b87-3f99-084d-e053-2991aa0a8f62
displayName: DESCRIPTION SECTION
FDA Article Code: 34089-3

Metoprolol tartrate is a selective beta
1-adrenoreceptor blocking agent, available as 25 mg, 50 mg, and 100 mg tablets for oral administration. Metoprolol tartrate is (±)-1-(isopropylamino)-3-[
p-2-methoxyethyl)phenoxy]-2-propanol (2:1)
dextro-tartrate salt. Its structural formula is:

Metoprolol tartrate, USP is a white, crystalline powder with a molecular weight of 684.82. It is very soluble in water; freely soluble in methylene chloride, in chloroform, and in alcohol; slightly soluble in acetone; and insoluble in ether. Each tablet for oral administration contains 25 mg, 50 mg, or 100 mg of metoprolol tartrate and the following inactive ingredients: lactose monohydrate, colloidal silicon dioxide, hypromellose, magnesium stearate, microcrystalline cellulose, polyethylene glycol, titanium dioxide, sodium starch glycolate, talc and D & C Red #30 Aluminium Lake.

Special Populations


id: 6f3d9b87-3f9b-084d-e053-2991aa0a8f62
displayName: USE IN SPECIFIC POPULATIONS SECTION
FDA Article Code: 43684-0


Geriatric Patients
The geriatric population may show slightly higher plasma concentrations of metoprolol as a combined result of a decreased metabolism of the drug in elderly population and a decreased hepatic blood flow. However, this increase is not clinically significant or therapeutically relevant.
Renal Impairment
The systemic availability and half-life of metoprolol in patients with renal failure do not differ to a clinically significant degree from those in normal subjects.
Hepatic Impairment
Since the drug is primarily eliminated by hepatic metabolism, hepatic impairment may impact the pharmacokinetics of metoprolol. The elimination half-life of metoprolol is considerably prolonged, depending on severity (up to 7.2 h).

Clinical Studies


id: 6f3d9b87-3f9c-084d-e053-2991aa0a8f62
displayName: CLINICAL STUDIES SECTION
FDA Article Code: 34092-7


Hypertension
In controlled clinical studies, metoprolol has been shown to be an effective antihypertensive agent when used alone or as concomitant therapy with thiazide-type diuretics, at dosages of 100 mg to 450 mg daily. In controlled, comparative, clinical studies, metoprolol has been shown to be as effective an antihypertensive agent as propranolol, methyldopa, and thiazide-type diuretics, to be equally effective in supine and standing positions.
Angina Pectoris
In controlled clinical trials, metoprolol, administered 2 or 4 times daily, has been shown to be an effective antianginal agent, reducing the number of angina attacks and increasing exercise tolerance. The dosage used in these studies ranged from 100 mg to 400 mg daily. A controlled, comparative, clinical trial showed that metoprolol was indistinguishable from propranolol in the treatment of angina pectoris.
Myocardial Infarction
In a large (1,395 patients randomized), double-blind, placebo-controlled clinical study, metoprolol was shown to reduce 3 month mortality by 36% in patients with suspected or definite myocardial infarction. Patients were randomized and treated as soon as possible after their arrival in the hospital, once their clinical condition had stabilized and their hemodynamic status had been carefully evaluated. Subjects were ineligible if they had hypotension, bradycardia, peripheral signs of shock and/or more than minimal basal rales as signs of congestive heart failure. Initial treatment consisted of intravenous followed by oral administration of metoprolol or placebo, given in a coronary care or comparable unit. Oral maintenance therapy with metoprolol or placebo was then continued for 3 months. After this double-blind period, all patients were given metoprolol and followed up to one year.

The median delay from the onset of symptoms to the initiation of therapy was 8 hours in both the metoprolol and placebo treatment groups. Among patients treated with metoprolol, there were comparable reductions in 3 month mortality for those treated early (≤ 8 hours) and those in whom treatment was started later. Significant reductions in the incidence of ventricular fibrillation and in chest pain following initial intravenous therapy were also observed with metoprolol and were independent of the interval between onset of symptoms and initiation of therapy. In this study, patients treated with metoprolol received the drug both very early (intravenously) and during a subsequent 3 month period, while placebo patients received no beta-blocker treatment for this period. The study thus was able to show a benefit from the overall metoprolol regimen but cannot separate the benefit of very early intravenous treatment from the benefit of later beta-blocker therapy. Nonetheless, because the overall regimen showed a clear beneficial effect on survival without evidence of an early adverse effect on survival, one acceptable dosage regimen is the precise regimen used in the trial. Because the specific benefit of very early treatment remains to be defined however, it is also reasonable to administer the drug orally to patients at a later time as is recommended for certain other beta-blockers.

INDICATIONS AND USAGE


id: 6f3d9b87-3f9d-084d-e053-2991aa0a8f62
displayName: INDICATIONS & USAGE SECTION
FDA Article Code: 34067-9

Hypertension Metoprolol tartrate tablets are indicated for the treatment of hypertension. They may be used alone or in combination with other antihypertensive agents. Angina Pectoris Metoprolol tartrate tablets are indicated in the long-term treatment of angina pectoris. Myocardial Infarction Metoprolol tartrate tablets are indicated in the treatment of hemodynamically stable patients with definite or suspected acute myocardial infarction to reduce cardiovascular mortality when used alone or in conjunction with intravenous metoprolol. Oral Metoprolol tartrate tablets therapy can be initiated after intravenous metoprolol therapy or, alternatively, oral treatment can begin within 3 to 10 days of the acute event. (See DOSAGE AND ADMINISTRATIONCONTRAINDICATIONS, and WARNINGS).

CONTRAINDICATIONS


id: 6f3d9b87-3f9e-084d-e053-2991aa0a8f62
displayName: CONTRAINDICATIONS SECTION
FDA Article Code: 34070-3

Hypertension and Angina Metoprolol tartrate tablets are contraindicated in sinus bradycardia, heart block greater than first degree, cardiogenic shock, and overt cardiac failure (see WARNINGS). Hypersensitivity to metoprolol and related derivatives, or to any of the excipients; hypersensitivity to other beta-blockers (cross-sensitivity between beta-blockers can occur).

 

Sick-sinus syndrome.

Severe peripheral arterial circulatory disorders. Myocardial Infarction Metoprolol is contraindicated in patients with a heart rate < 45 beats/min; second- and third-degree heart block; significant first-degree heart block (P-R interval ≥ 0.24 sec); systolic blood pressure < 100 mmHg; or moderate to severe cardiac failure (see WARNINGS).

WARNINGS


id: 6f3d9b87-3f9f-084d-e053-2991aa0a8f62
displayName: WARNINGS AND PRECAUTIONS SECTION
FDA Article Code: 43685-7

Heart Failure Beta-blockers, like metoprolol, can cause depression of myocardial contractility and may precipitate heart failure and cardiogenic shock. If signs or symptoms of heart failure develop, treat the patient according to recommended guidelines. It may be necessary to lower the dose of metoprolol or to discontinue it. Ischemic Heart Disease Do not abruptly discontinue metoprolol therapy in patients with coronary artery disease. Severe exacerbation of angina, myocardial infarction and ventricular arrhythmias have been reported in patients with coronary artery disease following the abrupt discontinuation of therapy with beta-blockers. When discontinuing chronically administered metoprolol, particularly in patients with coronary artery disease, the dosage should be gradually reduced over a period of 1 to 2 weeks and the patient should be carefully monitored. If angina markedly worsens or acute coronary insufficiency develops, metoprolol administration should be reinstated promptly, at least temporarily, and other measures appropriate for the management of unstable angina should be taken. Patients should be warned against interruption or discontinuation of therapy without the physician’s advice. Because coronary artery disease is common and may be unrecognized, it may be prudent not to discontinue metoprolol therapy abruptly even in patients treated only for hypertension. Use During Major Surgery Chronically administered beta-blocking therapy should not be routinely withdrawn prior to major surgery; however, the impaired ability of the heart to respond to reflex adrenergic stimuli may augment the risks of general anesthesia and surgical procedures. Bradycardia Bradycardia, including sinus pause, heart block, and cardiac arrest have occurred with the use of metoprolol. Patients with first-degree atrioventricular block, sinus node dysfunction or conduction disorders may be at increased risk. Monitor heart rate and rhythm in patients receiving metoprolol. If severe bradycardia develops, reduce or stop metoprolol. Exacerbation of Bronchospastic Disease Patients with bronchospastic disease, should, in general, not receive beta-blockers, including metoprolol. Because of its relative beta
1 selectivity, however, metoprolol may be used in patients with bronchospastic disease who do not respond to, or cannot tolerate, other antihypertensive treatment. Because beta
1 selectivity is not absolute use the lowest possible dose of metoprolol and consider administering metoprolol in smaller doses 3 times daily, instead of larger doses 2 times daily, to avoid the higher plasma levels associated with the longer dosing interval (see DOSAGE AND ADMINISTRATION). Bronchodilators, including beta
2 agonists, should be readily available or administered concomitantly.
Diabetes and Hypoglycemia Beta-blockers may mask tachycardia occurring with hypoglycemia, but other manifestations such as dizziness and sweating may not be significantly affected. Pheochromocytoma If metoprolol is used in the setting of pheochromocytoma, it should be given in combination with an alpha-blocker, and only after the alpha-blocker has been initiated. Administration of beta-blockers alone in the setting of pheochromocytoma has been associated with a paradoxical increase in blood pressure due to the attenuation of beta-mediated vasodilatation in skeletal muscle. Thyrotoxicosis Metoprolol may mask certain clinical signs (e.g., tachycardia) of hyperthyroidism. Avoid abrupt withdrawal of beta-blockade, which might precipitate a thyroid storm. PRECAUTIONS Risk of Anaphylactic Reactions While taking beta-blockers, patients with a history of severe anaphylactic reaction to a variety of allergens may be more reactive to repeated challenge, either accidental, diagnostic or therapeutic. Such patients may be unresponsive to the usual doses of epinephrine used to treat allergic reaction. Information for Patients Advise patients to take metoprolol regularly and continuously, as directed, with or immediately following meals. If a dose should be missed, the patient should take only the next scheduled dose (without doubling it). Patients should not discontinue metoprolol without consulting the physician. Advise patients (1) to avoid operating automobiles and machinery or engaging in other tasks requiring alertness until the patient’s response to therapy with metoprolol has been determined; (2) to contact the physician if any difficulty in breathing occurs; (3) to inform the physician or dentist before any type of surgery that he or she is taking metoprolol.

Drug Interactions


id: 6f3d9b87-3fa0-084d-e053-2991aa0a8f62
displayName: DRUG INTERACTIONS SECTION
FDA Article Code: 34073-7


Catecholamine-Depleting Drugs
Catecholamine-depleting drugs (e.g., reserpine) may have an additive effect when given with beta-blocking agents or monoamine oxidase (MAO) inhibitors. Observe patients treated with metoprolol plus a catecholamine depletor for evidence of hypotension or marked bradycardia, which may produce vertigo, syncope, or postural hypotension. In addition, possibly significant hypertension may theoretically occur up to 14 days following discontinuation of the concomitant administration with an irreversible MAO inhibitor.
Digitalis Glycosides and Beta-Blockers
Both digitalis glycosides and beta-blockers slow atrioventricular conduction and decrease heart rate. Concomitant use can increase the risk of bradycardia. Monitor heart rate and PR interval.
Calcium Channel Blockers
Concomitant administration of a beta-adrenergic antagonist with a calcium channel blocker may produce an additive reduction in myocardial contractility because of negative chronotropic and inotropic effects. CYP2D6 Inhibitors Potent inhibitors of the CYP2D6 enzyme may increase the plasma concentration of metoprolol which would mimic the pharmacokinetics of CYP2D6 poor metabolizer (see CLINICAL PHARMACOLOGY: Pharmacokinetics). Increase in plasma concentrations of metoprolol would decrease the cardioselectivity of metoprolol. Known clinically significant potent inhibitors of CYP2D6 are antidepressants such as fluvoxamine, fluoxetine, paroxetine, sertraline, bupropion, clomipramine and desipramine; antipsychotics such as chlorpromazine, fluphenazine, haloperidol and thioridazine; antiarrhythmics such as quinidine or propafenone; antiretrovirals such as ritonavir; antihistamines such as diphenhydramine; antimalarials such as hydroxychloroquine or quinidine; antifungals such as terbinafine.
Hydralazine
Concomitant administration of hydralazine may inhibit presystemic metabolism of metoprolol leading to increased concentrations of metoprolol.
Alpha-Adrenergic Agents
Antihypertensive effect of alpha-adrenergic blockers such as guanethidine, betanidine, reserpine, alpha-methyldopa or clonidine may be potentiated by beta-blockers including metoprolol. Beta- adrenergic blockers may also potentiate the postural hypotensive effect of the first dose of prazosin, probably by preventing reflex tachycardia. On the contrary, beta-adrenergic blockers may also potentiate the hypertensive response to withdrawal of clonidine in patients receiving concomitant clonidine and beta-adrenergic blocker. If a patient is treated with clonidine and metoprolol concurrently, and clonidine treatment is to be discontinued, stop metoprolol several days before clonidine is withdrawn. Rebound hypertension that can follow withdrawal of clonidine may be increased in patients receiving concurrent beta-blocker treatment.
Ergot Alkaloid
Concomitant administration with beta-blockers may enhance the vasoconstrictive action of ergot alkaloids.
Dipyridamole
In general, administration of a beta-blocker should be withheld before dipyridamole testing, with careful monitoring of heart rate following the dipyridamole injection.

HOW SUPPLIED


id: 6f3da6e6-6904-53d1-e053-2991aa0a9999
displayName: HOW SUPPLIED SECTION
FDA Article Code: 34069-5

Metoprolol Tartrate Tablets, USP are available containing 25 mg of metoprolol tartrate, USP. The 25 mg tablets are film-coated, pink colored, round, biconvex tablets debossed with R 25 on one side and scored on the other side. NDC 43063-846-30: Bottles of 30 NDC 43063-846-90: Bottles of 90 NDC 43063-846-93: Bottles of 180 Store at 20° to 25°C (68° to 77°F). [See USP Controlled Room Temperature.] Protect from moisture.

Dispense in a tight, light-resistant container as defined in the USP using a child-resistant closure. To report SUSPECTED ADVERSE REACTIONS, contact FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088 or www.fda.gov/medwatch.