DEXTROAMPHETAMINE SULFATE ORAL SOLUTION CII, 5 mg/ 5 mL  Rx ONLY

/DEXTROAMPHETAMINE SULFATE ORAL SOLUTION CII, 5 mg/ 5 mL  Rx ONLY
DEXTROAMPHETAMINE SULFATE ORAL SOLUTION CII, 5 mg/ 5 mL  Rx ONLY2018-09-06T09:12:40+00:00

Prescription Drug Name:

DEXTROAMPHETAMINE SULFATE ORAL SOLUTION CII, 5 mg/ 5 mL  Rx ONLY

ID:

f35f9661-9066-4298-8aa2-2e16bb187066

Code:

34391-3

BOXED WARNING


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displayName: BOXED WARNING SECTION
FDA Article Code: 34066-1

AMPHETAMINES HAVE A HIGH POTENTIAL FOR ABUSE. ADMINISTRATION OF AMPHETAMINES FOR PROLONGED PERIODS OF TIME MAY LEAD TO DRUG DEPENDENCE AND MUST BE AVOIDED. PARTICULAR ATTENTION SHOULD BE PAID TO THE POSSIBILITY OF SUBJECTS OBTAINING AMPHETAMINES FOR NON-THERAPEUTIC USE OR DISTRIBUTION TO OTHERS, AND THE DRUGS SHOULD BE PRESCRIBED OR DISPENSED SPARINGLY. MISUSE OF AMPHETAMINES MAY CAUSE SUDDEN DEATH AND SERIOUS CARDIOVASCULAR ADVERSE EVENTS.

​DESCRIPTION


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displayName: DESCRIPTION SECTION
FDA Article Code: 34089-3

Dextroamphetamine sulfate is the dextro isomer of the compound d,l-amphetamine sulfate, a sympathomimetic amine of the amphetamine group. Chemically, dextroamphetamine is d-alpha-methylphenethylamine, and is present in all forms of dextroamphetamine sulfate as the neutral sulfate. Structural Formula: Dextroamphetamine sulfate is a colorless, bubble gum flavored oral solution. Each 5 mL (1 teaspoonful) of dextroamphetamine sulfate oral solution contains 5 mg of dextroamphetamine sulfate. Inactive ingredients consist of anhydrous citric acid, benzoic acid, bubble gum flavor, purified water, sodium citrate anhydrous, sodium saccharin, and sorbitol solution.

CLINICAL PHARMACOLOGY


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displayName: CLINICAL PHARMACOLOGY SECTION
FDA Article Code: 34090-1

Amphetamines are noncatecholamine, sympathomimetic amines with CNS stimulant activity. Peripheral actions include elevations of systolic and diastolic blood pressures and weak bronchodilator and respiratory stimulant action. There is neither specific evidence that clearly establishes the mechanism whereby amphetamines produce mental and behavioral effects in children, nor conclusive evidence regarding how these effects relate to the condition of the central nervous system.

INDICATIONS AND USAGE


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displayName: INDICATIONS & USAGE SECTION
FDA Article Code: 34067-9

Dextroamphetamine sulfate oral solution is indicated in: Narcolepsy Attention Deficit Disorder with Hyperactivity: As an integral part of a total treatment program that typically includes other remedial measures (psychological, educational, social) for a stabilizing effect in pediatric patients (ages 3 years to 16 years) with a behavioral syndrome characterized by the following group of developmentally inappropriate symptoms: Moderate to severe distractibility, short attention span, hyperactivity, emotional lability, and impulsivity. The diagnosis of this syndrome should not be made with finality when these symptoms are only of comparatively recent origin. Nonlocalizing (soft) neurological signs, learning disability, and abnormal EEG may or may not be present, and a diagnosis of central nervous system dysfunction may or may not be warranted.

CONTRAINDICATIONS


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displayName: CONTRAINDICATIONS SECTION
FDA Article Code: 34070-3

Advanced arteriosclerosis, symptomatic cardiovascular disease, moderate to severe hypertension, hyperthyroidism, known hypersensitivity or idiosyncrasy to the sympathomimetic amines, glaucoma. Agitated states. Patients with a history of drug abuse. During or within 14 days following the administration of monoamine oxidase inhibitors (hypertensive crisis may result).

WARNINGS


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displayName: WARNINGS SECTION
FDA Article Code: 34071-1

Serious Cardiovascular Events Sudden Death in Patients with Pre-existing Structural Cardiac Abnormalities or Other Serious Heart Problems:

Children and Adolescents:
Sudden death has been reported in association with CNS stimulant treatment at usual doses in children and adolescents with structural cardiac abnormalities or other serious heart problems. Although some serious heart problems alone carry an increased risk of sudden death, stimulant products generally should not be used in children or adolescents with known serious structural cardiac abnormalities, cardiomyopathy, serious heart rhythm abnormalities, or other serious cardiac problems that may place them at increased vulnerability to the sympathomimetic effects of a stimulant drug.

Adults:
Sudden deaths, stroke, and myocardial infarction have been reported in adults taking stimulant drugs at usual doses for ADHD. Although the role of stimulants in these adult cases is also unknown, adults have a greater likelihood than children of having serious structural cardiac abnormalities, cardiomyopathy, serious heart rhythm abnormalities, coronary artery disease, or other serious cardiac problems. Adults with such abnormalities should also generally not be treated with stimulant drugs (see CONTRAINDICATIONS ).
Hypertension and Other Cardiovascular Conditions: Stimulant medications cause a modest increase in average blood pressure (about 2-4 mmHg) and average heart rate (about 3-6 bpm), and individuals may have larger increases. While the mean changes alone would not be expected to have short term consequences, all patients should be monitored for larger changes in heart rate and blood pressure. Caution is indicated in treating patients whose underlying medical conditions might be compromised by increases in blood pressure or heart rate, e.g., those with pre-existing hypertension, heart failure, recent myocardial infarction, or ventricular arrhythmia (see CONTRAINDICATIONS ). Assessing Cardiovascular Status in Patients Being Treated With Stimulant Medications: Children, adolescents, or adults who are being considered for treatment with stimulant medications should have a careful history (including assessment for a family history of sudden death or ventricular arrhythmia) and physical exam to assess for the presence of cardiac disease, and should receive further cardiac evaluation if findings suggest such disease (e.g., electrocardiogram and echocardiogram). Patients who develop symptoms such as exertional chest pain, unexplained syncope, or other symptoms suggestive of cardiac disease during stimulant treatment should undergo a prompt cardiac evaluation. Psychiatric Adverse Events Pre-Existing Psychosis: Administration of stimulants may exacerbate symptoms of behavior disturbance and thought disorder in patients with pre-existing psychotic disorder. Bipolar Illness: Particular care should be taken in using stimulants to treat ADHD in patients with comorbid bipolar disorder because of concern for possible induction of a mixed/manic episode in such patients. Prior to initiating treatment with stimulant, patients with comorbid depressive symptoms should be adequately screened to determine if they are at risk for bipolar disorder; such screening should include a detailed psychiatric history, including a family history of suicide, bipolar disorder, and depression. Emergence of New Psychotic or Manic Symptoms: Treatment emergent psychotic or manic symptoms, e.g., hallucinations, delusional thinking, or mania in children and adolescents without a prior history of psychotic illness or mania can be caused by stimulants at usual doses. If such symptoms occur, consideration should be given to a possible causal role of the stimulant, and discontinuation of treatment may be appropriate. In a pooled analysis of multiple short-term, placebo-controlled studies, such symptoms occurred in about 0.1% (4 patients with events out of 3,482 exposed to methylphenidate or amphetamine for several weeks at usual doses) of stimulant-treated patients compared to 0 in placebo-treated patients. Aggression: Aggressive behavior or hostility is often observed in children and adolescents with ADHD, and has been reported in clinical trials and the postmarketing experience of some medications indicated for the treatment of ADHD. Although there is no systematic evidence that stimulants cause aggressive behavior or hostility, patients beginning treatment for ADHD should be monitored for the appearance of, or worsening of, aggressive behavior or hostility. Long-Term Suppression of Growth: Careful follow-up of weight and height in children ages 7 to 10 years who were randomized to either methylphenidate or non-medication treatment groups over 14 months, as well as in naturalistic subgroups of newly methylphenidate-treated and non-medication treated children over 36 months (to the ages of 10 to 13 years), suggests that consistently medicated children (i.e., treatment for 7 days per week throughout the year) have a temporary slowing in growth rate (on average, a total of about 2 cm less growth in height and 2.7 kg less growth in weight over 3 years), without evidence of growth rebound during this period of development. Published data are inadequate to determine whether chronic use of amphetamines may cause a similar suppression of growth, however, it is anticipated that they likely have this effect as well. Therefore, growth should be monitored during treatment with stimulants, and patients who are not growing or gaining height or weight as expected may need to have their treatment interrupted. Seizures: There is some clinical evidence that stimulants may lower the convulsive threshold in patients with prior history of seizures, in patients with prior EEG abnormalities in absence of seizures, and, very rarely, in patients without a history of seizures and no prior EEG evidence of seizures. In the presence of seizures, the drug should be discontinued. Peripheral Vasculopathy, Including Raynaud’s Phenomenon: Stimulants, including Dextroamphetamine sulfate oral solution, used to treat ADHD are associated with peripheral vasculopathy, including Raynaud’s phenomenon. Signs and symptoms are usually intermittent and mild; however, very rare sequelae include digital ulcerations and/or soft tissue breakdown. Effects of peripheral vasculopathy, including Raynaud’s phenomenon, were observed in post-marketing reports at different times and at therapeutic doses in all age groups throughout the course of treatment. Signs and symptoms generally improve after reduction in dose or discontinuation of drug. Careful observation for digital changes is necessary during treatment with ADHD stimulants. Further clinical evaluation (e.g., rheumatology referral) may be appropriate for certain patients. Serotonin Syndrome: Serotonin syndrome, a potentially life-threatening reaction, may occur when amphetamines are used in combination with other drugs that affect the serotonergic neurotransmitter systems such as monoamine oxidase inhibitors (MAOIs), selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs), serotonin norepinephrine reuptake inhibitors (SNRIs), triptans, tricyclic antidepressants, fentanyl, lithium, tramadol, tryptophan, buspirone, and St. John’s Wort [see DRUG INTERACTIONS ]. Amphetamines and amphetamine derivatives are known to be metabolized, to some degree, by cytochrome P450 2D6 (CYP2D6) and display minor inhibition of CYP2D6 metabolism [see CLINICAL PHARMACOLOGY ]. The potential for a pharmacokinetic interaction exists with the coadministration of CYP2D6 inhibitors which may increase the risk with increased exposure to Dextroamphetamine Sulfate Oral Solution. In these situations, consider an alternative non-serotonergic drug or an alternative drug that does not inhibit CYP2D6 [see DRUG INTERACTIONS ]. Serotonin syndrome symptoms may include mental status changes (e.g., agitation, hallucinations, delirium, and coma), autonomic instability (e.g., tachycardia, labile blood pressure, dizziness, diaphoresis, flushing, hyperthermia), neuromuscular symptoms (e.g., tremor, rigidity, myoclonus, hyperreflexia, incoordination), seizures, and/or gastrointestinal symptoms (e.g., nausea, vomiting, diarrhea). Concomitant use of Dextroamphetamine Sulfate Oral Solution with MAOI drugs is contraindicated [see CONTRAINDICATIONS ]. Discontinue treatment with Dextroamphetamine Sulfate Oral Solution and any concomitant serotonergic agents immediately if the above symptoms occur, and initiate supportive symptomatic treatment. If concomitant use of Dextroamphetamine Sulfate Oral Solution with other serotonergic drugs or CYP2D6 inhibitors is clinically warranted, initiate Dextroamphetamine Sulfate Oral Solution with lower doses, monitor patients for the emergence of serotonin syndrome during drug initiation or titration, and inform patients of the increased risk for serotonin syndrome. Visual Disturbance: Difficulties with accommodation and blurring of vision have been reported with stimulant treatment.

ADVERSE REACTIONS


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displayName: ADVERSE REACTIONS SECTION
FDA Article Code: 34084-4

To report SUSPECTED ADVERSE REACTIONS, contact Tris Pharma, Inc. at 1-732-940-0358 or FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088 or www.fda.gov/medwatch. Cardiovascular: Palpitations, tachycardia, elevation of blood pressure. There have been isolated reports of cardiomyopathy associated with chronic amphetamine use. Central Nervous System: Psychotic episodes at recommended doses (rare), overstimulation, restlessness, dizziness, insomnia, euphoria, dyskinesia, dysphoria, tremor, headache, exacerbation of motor and phonic tics and Tourette’s syndrome. Gastrointestinal: Dryness of the mouth, unpleasant taste, diarrhea, constipation, other gastrointestinal disturbances. Anorexia and weight loss may occur as undesirable effects. Allergic: Urticaria. Endocrine: Impotence, changes in libido. Musculoskeletal: Rhabdomyolysis.

DRUG ABUSE AND DEPENDENCE


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displayName: DRUG ABUSE AND DEPENDENCE SECTION
FDA Article Code: 42227-9

Dextroamphetamine sulfate is a Schedule II controlled substance. Amphetamines have been extensively abused. Tolerance, extreme psychological dependence and severe social disability have occurred. There are reports of patients who have increased the dosage to many times that recommended. Abrupt cessation following prolonged high dosage administration results in extreme fatigue and mental depression; changes are also noted on the sleep EEG. Manifestations of chronic intoxication with amphetamines include severe dermatoses, marked insomnia, irritability, hyperactivity and personality changes. The most severe manifestation of chronic intoxication is psychosis, often clinically indistinguishable from schizophrenia. This is rare with oral amphetamines.

OVERDOSAGE


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displayName: OVERDOSAGE SECTION
FDA Article Code: 34088-5

Individual patient response to amphetamines varies widely. While toxic symptoms occasionally occur as an idiosyncrasy at doses as low as 2 mg, they are rare with doses of less than 15 mg; 30 mg can produce severe reactions, yet doses of 400 to 500 mg are not necessarily fatal. In rats, the oral LD50 of dextroamphetamine sulfate is 96.8 mg/kg. Manifestations of acute overdosage with amphetamines include restlessness, tremor, hyperreflexia, rhabdomyolysis, rapid respiration, hyperpyrexia, confusion, assaultiveness, hallucinations, panic states. Fatigue and depression usually follow the central stimulation. Cardiovascular effects include arrhythmias, hypertension or hypotension and circulatory collapse. Gastrointestinal symptoms include nausea, vomiting, diarrhea and abdominal cramps. Fatal poisoning is usually proceeded by convulsions and coma.

TREATMENT


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displayName: SPL UNCLASSIFIED SECTION
FDA Article Code: 42229-5

Consult with a Certified Poison Control Center for up-to-date guidance and advice. Management of acute amphetamine intoxication is largely symptomatic and includes gastric lavage, administration of activated charcoal, administration of a cathartic, and sedation. Experience with hemodialysis or peritoneal dialysis is inadequate to permit recommendation in this regard. Acidification of the urine increases amphetamine excretion, but is believed to increase risk of acute renal failure if myoglobinuria is present. If acute, severe hypertension complicates amphetamine overdosage, administration of intravenous phentolamine (Bedford Laboratories) has been suggested. However, a gradual drop in blood pressure will usually result when sufficient sedation has been achieved. Chlorpromazine antagonizes the central stimulant effects of amphetamines and can be used to treat amphetamine intoxication.

DOSAGE AND ADMINISTRATION


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displayName: DOSAGE & ADMINISTRATION SECTION
FDA Article Code: 34068-7

Amphetamines should be administered at the lowest effective dosage and dosage should be individually adjusted. Late evening doses should be avoided because of the resulting insomnia. Narcolepsy: Usual dose is 5 mg to 60 mg per day in divided doses, depending on the individual patient response. Narcolepsy seldom occurs in children under 12 years of age; however, when it does, dextroamphetamine sulfate oral solution may be used. The suggested initial dose for patients aged 6 to 12 is 5 mg daily; daily dose may be raised in increments of 5 mg at weekly intervals until optimal response is obtained. In patients 12 years of age and older, start with 10 mg daily; daily dosage may be raised in increments of 10 mg at weekly intervals until optimal response is obtained. If bothersome adverse reactions appear (e.g., insomnia or anorexia), dosage should be reduced. Give first dose on awakening; additional doses (1 or 2) at intervals of 4 to 6 hours. Attention Deficit Disorder with Hyperactivity: Not recommended for pediatric patients under 3 years of age. In pediatric patients from 3 to 5 years of age, start with 2.5 mg daily; daily dosage may be raised in increments of 2.5 mg at weekly intervals until optimal response is obtained. In pediatric patients 6 years of age and older, start with 5 mg once or twice daily; daily dosage may be raised in increments of 5 mg at weekly intervals until optimal response is obtained. Only in rare cases will it be necessary to exceed a total of 40 mg per day. Give first dose on awakening; additional doses (1 or 2) at intervals of 4 to 6 hours. Where possible, drug administration should be interrupted occasionally to determine if there is a recurrence of behavioral symptoms sufficient to require continued therapy.

HOW SUPPLIED


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displayName: HOW SUPPLIED SECTION
FDA Article Code: 34069-5

Dextroamphetamine sulfate oral solution 5 mg/5 mL is a colorless, bubble gum flavored oral solution. It is available in 16 fluid ounces (473 mL) bottles, NDC 27808-085-01. Store at 20° to 25°C (68° to 77°F); excursions permitted from 15° to 30°C (59° to 86°F) [see USP Controlled Room Temperature]. Dispense in a tight, light resistant container. Manufactured by Tris Pharma, Inc. Monmouth Junction, NJ 08852 www.trispharma.com LB8255 Rev 03 October 2016

MEDICATION GUIDE


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displayName: SPL MEDGUIDE SECTION
FDA Article Code: 42231-1

DEXTROAMPHETAMINE SULFATE
ORAL SOLUTION
CII, 5 mg/5 mL
(DEX-troe-am-FET-a-meen SUL-fate) Rx Only Please read the Medication Guide that comes with Dextroamphetamine Sulfate Oral Solution before you or your child starts taking it and each time you get a refill. There may be new information. This Medication Guide does not take the place of talking to your doctor about your or your child’s treatment with Dextroamphetamine Sulfate Oral Solution.

 What is the most important information I should know about Dextroamphetamine Sulfate Oral Solution? The following have been reported with use of Dextroamphetamine Sulfate Oral Solution and other stimulant medicines.  

1. Heart-related problems:
• sudden death in patients who have heart problems or heart defects • stroke and heart attack in adults • increased blood pressure and heart rate Tell your doctor if you or your child have any heart problems, heart defects, high blood pressure, or a family history of these problems. Your doctor should check you or your child carefully for heart problems before starting Dextroamphetamine Sulfate Oral Solution. Your doctor should check your or your child’s blood pressure and heart rate regularly during treatment with Dextroamphetamine Sulfate Oral Solution. Call your doctor right away if you or your child has any signs of heart problems such as chest pain, shortness of breath, or fainting while taking Dextroamphetamine Sulfate Oral Solution.
2. Mental (Psychiatric) problems:
All Patients • new or worse behavior and thought problems • new or worse bipolar illness • new or worse aggressive behavior or hostility Children and Teenagers • new psychotic symptoms (such as hearing voices, believing things that are not true, are suspicious) or new manic symptoms Tell your doctor about any mental problems you or your child have, or about a family history of suicide, bipolar illness, or depression. Call your doctor right away if you or your child have any new or worsening mental symptoms or problems while taking Dextroamphetamine Sulfate Oral Solution, especially seeing or hearing things that are not real, believing things that are not real, or are suspicious.
3. Circulation problems in fingers and toes

 [Peripheral vasculopathy, including Raynaud’s phenomenon]:
• fingers or toes may feel numb, cool, painful • fingers or toes may change color from pale, to blue, to red Tell your doctor if you have or your child has numbness, pain, skin color change, or sensitivity to temperature in your fingers or toes.  Call your doctor right away if you have or your child has any signs of unexplained wounds appearing on fingers or toes while taking Dextroamphetamine Sulfate Oral Solution.
What is Dextroamphetamine Sulfate Oral Solution? Dextroamphetamine Sulfate Oral Solution is a central nervous system stimulant prescription medicine. It is used for the treatment of Attention-Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD). Dextroamphetamine Sulfate Oral Solution may help increase attention and decrease impulsiveness and hyperactivity in patients with ADHD. Dextroamphetamine Sulfate Oral Solution should be used as a part of a total treatment program for ADHD that may include counseling or other therapies. Dextroamphetamine Sulfate Oral Solution is also used in the treatment of a sleep disorder called narcolepsy.
Dextroamphetamine Sulfate Oral Solution is a federally controlled substance (CII) because it can be abused or lead to dependence. Keep Dextroamphetamine Sulfate Oral Solution in a safe place to prevent misuse and abuse. Selling or giving away Dextroamphetamine Sulfate Oral Solution may harm others, and is against the law. Tell your doctor if you or your child have (or have a family history of) ever abused or been dependent on alcohol, prescription medicines or street drugs.
Who should not take Dextroamphetamine Sulfate Oral Solution? Dextroamphetamine Sulfate Oral Solution should not be taken if you or your child: • have heart disease or hardening of the arteries • have moderate to severe high blood pressure • have hyperthyroidism • have an eye problem called glaucoma • are very anxious, tense, or agitated • have a history of drug abuse • are taking or have taken within the past 14 days an antidepression medicine called a monoamine oxidase inhibitor or MAOI • is sensitive to, allergic to, or had a reaction to other stimulant medicines Dextroamphetamine Sulfate Oral Solution is not recommended for use in children less than 3 years old. Dextroamphetamine Sulfate Oral Solution may not be right for you or your child. Before starting Dextroamphetamine Sulfate Oral Solution tell your or your child’s doctor about all health conditions (or a family history of) including: • heart problems, heart defects, high blood pressure • mental problems including psychosis, mania, bipolar illness, or depression • tics or Tourette’s syndrome • thyroid problems • seizures or have had an abnormal brain wave test (EEG) • circulation problems in fingers and toes Tell your doctor if you or your child is pregnant, planning to become pregnant, or breastfeeding. Can Dextroamphetamine Sulfate Oral Solution be taken with other medicines? Tell your doctor about all of the medicines that you or your child take including prescription and nonprescription medicines, vitamins, and herbal supplements. Dextroamphetamine Sulfate Oral Solution and some medicines may interact with each other and cause serious side effects. Sometimes the doses of other medicines will need to be adjusted while taking Dextroamphetamine Sulfate Oral Solution. Your doctor will decide whether Dextroamphetamine Sulfate Oral Solution can be taken with other medicines. Especially tell your doctor if you or your child take: • antidepression medicines including MAOIs • antacids • blood pressure medicines • seizure medicines Know the medicines that you or your child take. Keep a list of your medicines with you to show your doctor and pharmacist. Do not start any new medicine while taking Dextroamphetamine Sulfate Oral Solution without talking to your doctor first. How should Dextroamphetamine Sulfate Oral Solution be taken?
Take Dextroamphetamine Sulfate Oral Solution exactly as prescribed.
Your doctor may adjust the dose until it is right for you or your child.
Dextroamphetamine Sulfate Oral Solution is usually taken two to three times a day. The first dose is usually taken in the morning. One or two more doses may be taken during the day, 4 to 6 hours apart. From time to time, your doctor may stop Dextroamphetamine Sulfate Oral Solution treatment for a while to check ADHD symptoms. Your doctor may do regular checks of the blood, heart, and blood pressure while taking Dextroamphetamine Sulfate Oral Solution. Children should have their height and weight checked often while taking Dextroamphetamine Sulfate Oral Solution. Treatment with Dextroamphetamine Sulfate Oral Solution treatment may be stopped if a problem is found during these check-ups.
If you or your child take too much Dextroamphetamine Sulfate Oral Solution or overdoses, call your doctor or poison control center right away, or get emergency treatment.
What are possible side effects of Dextroamphetamine Sulfate Oral Solution? See “What is the most important information I should know about Dextroamphetamine Sulfate Oral Solution?” for information on reported heart and mental problems. Other serious side effects include: • slowing of growth (height and weight) in children • seizures, mainly in patients with a history of seizures • eyesight changes or blurred vision • Serotonin syndrome. A potentially life-threatening problem called serotonin syndrome can happen when medicines such as Dextroamphetamine Sulfate Oral Solution are taken with certain other medicines. Symptoms of serotonin syndrome may include:     • agitation, hallucinations, coma or other changes in mental status     • problems controlling your movements or muscle twitching     • fast heartbeat     • high or low blood pressure     • sweating or fever     • nausea or vomiting     • diarrhea     • muscle stiffness or tightness Common side effects include: • fast heart beat • stomach upset • headache • tremors • dry mouth • dizziness • trouble sleeping • decreased appetite • weight loss Dextroamphetamine Sulfate Oral Solution may affect you or your child’s ability to drive or do other dangerous activities. Talk to your doctor if you or your child have side effects that are bothersome or do not go away. This is not a complete list of possible side effects. Ask your doctor or pharmacist for more information. Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. You may report side effects to FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088. How should I store Dextroamphetamine Sulfate Oral Solution? Store Dextroamphetamine Sulfate Oral Solution in a safe place at controlled room temperature, 68° to 77°F (20° to 25°C). Protect from light. • Keep Dextroamphetamine Sulfate Oral Solution and all medicines out of the reach of children. General information about Dextroamphetamine Sulfate Oral Solution Medicines are sometimes prescribed for purposes other than those listed in a Medication Guide. Do not use Dextroamphetamine Sulfate Oral Solution for a condition for which it was not prescribed. Do not give Dextroamphetamine Sulfate Oral Solution to other people, even if they have the same condition. It may harm them and it is against the law. This Medication Guide summarizes the most important information about Dextroamphetamine Sulfate Oral Solution. If you would like more information, talk with your doctor. You can ask your doctor or pharmacist for information about Dextroamphetamine Sulfate Oral Solution that was written for healthcare professionals. For more information about Dextroamphetamine Sulfate Oral Solution, please contact Tris Pharma, Inc. at 1-732-940-0358 or go to www.trispharma.com. What are the ingredients in Dextroamphetamine Sulfate Oral Solution? Active Ingredient: dextroamphetamine sulfate Inactive Ingredients: anhydrous citric acid, benzoic acid, bubble gum flavor, purified water, sodium citrate anhydrous, sodium saccharin, and sorbitol solution. This Medication Guide has been approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration. Manufactured by Tris Pharma, Inc. LB8255 Rev 03 October 2016

PACKAGE LABEL.PRINCIPAL DISPLAY PANEL


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displayName: PACKAGE LABEL.PRINCIPAL DISPLAY PANEL
FDA Article Code: 51945-4